Cap Types

COLOURS AND PROPORTIONS MAY DIFFER FROM PICTURES BELOW.

HAND KNITTED,  HEAD SIZE ADJUSTABLE.

MONMOUTH CAP - 16th to 20th century, worn by soldiers sailors and Welshmen.

(see K. Buckland, The Monmouth Cap, 'Costume 13', Journal of the Costume Society, 1979)

PETER THE GREAT - 17th -18th century. Now in The Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, were worn to disguise the Czar when he worked in the Dutch and English shipyards. Daniel Defoe quotes eyewitness description of this. Similar 17c. examples found in Copenhagen.

BRUEGHEL (c.1525-1569) - a helpful source for scenes of peasant life, customs and costume.

HOLBEIN, SPLIT BRIM - There are many variations with plain circular brims, turned up, split, slashed or decorated brims."...Flat caps as proper are to City gowns..."

KRAVIC - 18th century. Excavated from the New York waterfront. Formerly owned by Frank Kravic and illustrated in 'The Collector'sIllustrated Encyclopedia of the American Revolution' (see K. Buckland, Monmouth Caps in America, Journal of 'Ars Textrina' 27, 1997)

Capture.PNG

HOLBEIN, PLAIN - flat caps are depicted in early 16th century drawings and paintings by Hans Holbein, court portraitist to King Henry VIII. Later called 'Statute Caps' and favoured by apprentices. Found in many museum collections.

HOLBEIN, SCALLOPED - When brims are slashed there is sometimes evidence of applied stiffening.

HALF BRIM - "...It shows the whole face boldly, tis not made as if a man to look on't were afraid...".

CANTERBURY, (FROM SIDE) - Worn by clerics and clerks; Holbein's portraits of Sir Thomas More and his family show square black caps with curved sides.

KEMP - William Kemp's "Nine daies wonder Performed in a daunce from London to Norwich ...Written by himselfe to satisfie his friends...1600."

ROB ROY - The Scottish hero is portrayed in a bonnet trimmed with red knots as excavated from an 18c. site at Arnish Moor, Lewis.

DICED BAND, inside wiew.

THRUM - Thrums were the rejected ends of weavers' warps and obtainable free. Warm and water-repellent for sailors who provided their own clothing.

MARY ROSE BRIM - 16c. Flat caps were excavated from Henry VIII's famous warship, the 'Mary Rose', which sank in 1545. Also the Barber-Surgeon's silk velvet coif (see K. Buckland, 'Before the Mast, Life & Death Aboard the Mary Rose', 2005)

SCALLOPED

CANTERBURY, (FROM TOP)

SCOTS BONNET, INDIGO - Imported indigo improved the dye quality and fasness of traditional blue bonnets.

REGIMENTAL SCOTS BONNET with DICED BAND - 18th-19th century. Scottish regiments fought in America and at Waterloo.

DURER

HAKLUYT

MARY ROSE BRIM - Has an unusually shaped split-brim found on board.

BRUEGEL TRIMMED: see above.

AGINCOURT - said to be seen in the Agincourt Roll.

BRUEGHEL (c.1525-1569) - a helpful source for scenes of peasant life, customs and costume.

HUMMEL

DURER

WARBECK - Perkin Warbeck, unsuccessful pretender to the throne in 1490s.

ERASMUS - Similar to the Canterbury, square crown but with shallower sloping sides.

MUSICIAN

ARRAS

WARWICK - Ordered for tableaux in Warwick Castle, "Warwick the Kingmaker", and worn by the archers.

EARFLAPS - Also worn in "An Enemy of the People" at the National Theatre, 1997.

LONDON EAR FLAPS - An intricate example from the collection in the Museum of London.

COIF - Often worn under flat caps by older men

COIF

DA VINCI

GROSMONT

UFFIZI

IBSEN - Worn by Sir Ian MacKellen in "An enemy of the People" at the National Theatre, 1997.

YORICK - Worn by the skull in Hamletin two London productions.

WARWICK TRIMMED

PEAKED SHERWOOD - not successful. must try again when time.

100% FELTED WOOL - ALL FROM CONTEMPORARY SOURCES.

PLEASE RESEARCH YOUR PERIOD BEFORE ORDERING.